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Tequila and agave.Scientific name: Agave angustifolia

Other common names: Espadilla, Tepemete, Pelón Verde

The ancestor of the Tequila agave, espadín is by far the most commercialized species after Agave tequilana, responsible for at least 80% of all mezcal sold. It resembles Agave tequilana Weber closely enough that espadín was discreetly brought from Oaxaca during Tequila’s severe agave shortage of the early 2000s.

Espadín’s ubiquity is due largely to its high sugar concentration, which can yield larger volumes of spirit than other agave species (it takes about 20 pounds of espadín to make a liter of mezcal, while some agaves can require more than triple that amount). Its piña, the heart of the plant named for its resemblance to a pineapple, usually weighs 120–150 pounds. Espadín mezcals are full and sweet, with honeyed sweet-potato notes of roasted agave.

Mezcal aficionados sometimes dismiss espadín for its preponderance and perceived lack of complexity, but in the right hands it can make a delicious spirit. “Espadin makes great mezcals, depending on the mezcalero, the quality of the piñas, and what processes they use to bring out the best in it,” says García.

Tequila and agave

ARROQUEÑO

Scientific name: Agave americana

Other common names: Sierra Negra, Serrano, Sierrudo, Coyote

There are many subspecies of Agave americana that vary in appearance but share certain qualities. Arroqueño usually refers to the oaxacensis variety, but terminology can differ depending on the region. These huge agaves can be 8 feet tall and 11 feet around, with piñas weighing from 200 to more than 450 pounds. For producers, this can mean as many as 30 bottles of mezcal per plant. The strong cooked-agave flavor shows through with layered herbs and spices.

“These are huge magueys but they have very complex flavors,” says maestro mezcalero Félix Ángeles of the Oaxacan village of Santa Catarina Minas. “They can be intense, but compared to espadín, their sweetness is much less obvious.”

Scientific name: Agave angustifolia

Tequila and agave.Other common names: Espadilla, Tepemete, Pelón Verde

The ancestor of the Tequila agave, espadín is by far the most commercialized species after Agave tequilana, responsible for at least 80% of all mezcal sold. It resembles Agave tequilana Weber closely enough that espadín was discreetly brought from Oaxaca during Tequila’s severe agave shortage of the early 2000s.

Espadín’s ubiquity is due largely to its high sugar concentration, which can yield larger volumes of spirit than other agave species (it takes about 20 pounds of espadín to make a liter of mezcal, while some agaves can require more than triple that amount). Its piña, the heart of the plant named for its resemblance to a pineapple, usually weighs 120–150 pounds. Espadín mezcals are full and sweet, with honeyed sweet-potato notes of roasted agave.

Mezcal aficionados sometimes dismiss espadín for its preponderance and perceived lack of complexity, but in the right hands it can make a delicious spirit. “Espadin makes great mezcals, depending on the mezcalero, the quality of the piñas, and what processes they use to bring out the best in it,” says García.tequila and agave

We can produce custom-made agave glass bottles in various styles. You can choose the right bottle from our 1000’s of bottle types available.

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tequila and agave

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